Property Risk Product

HITS

CGI’s Habitational Insurance Tracking System (HITS) provides insurers with online access to 98 percent of all available personal property claims data in Canada, including Quebec (55 percent), making it the most comprehensive source of personal property claims information available today. Underwriters rely on HITS to identify bad risks before they become a part of their book of business. Claims personnel benefit from HITS detailed claims history, which allows patterns of suspicious claims to be identified early in the claims adjustment process and appropriate action to be taken. When used in conjunction with the other tools in CGI's personal property toolbox, HITS provides key information necessary for better and faster decision making in your personal property underwriting and claims adjustment processes. Even when there is no claims information available for the insured or the property, HITS can help underwriters assess a particular risk by providing a "score" for the area.

GEOScore

GEOScore uses claims data from HITS and demographic information to evaluate the industry loss experience within a given neighborhood. A numeric score for the area and key reason codes to support the score are conveniently delivered to the underwriter during the inquiry process.

HITS is available to any insurer that provides historical claims data, along with its brokers and agents. To ensure access to the most current information, participating companies must submit regular updates after their initial contribution of up to five years of claims data.

Insurers can access HITS quickly and easily through the Internet or by leveraging Web services, API, or batch technology, depending on their business requirements.

Summary of Benefits

  • Insurer-supplied information, ensuring accuracy and reliability
  • Quick and easy identification of application non-disclosures
  • Easy-to-use interface and fast information retrieval
  • Choice of report summaries or full details of all claims
  • Compliance with federal and provincial privacy requirements
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